What's up cop? Rabbit owners try to hop around the law

The owners told the police officers it was a guinea pig rather than a bunny, but the officers were unconvinced (Queensland Police / Facebook)
The owners told the police officers it was a guinea pig rather than a bunny, but the officers were unconvinced (Queensland Police / Facebook)

An Australian couple has tried to hop around laws governing rabbit ownership -- by claiming their fluffy pet is actually a guinea pig.

Rabbits are classed as a pest in Queensland and require special authorisation to be kept as pets.

Officers were called to the address for an unrelated incident when they discovered the rabbit living in a cage inside a caravan.

The owners told the police officers it was a guinea pig, but police were unconvinced.

They seized the furry creature and took it back to the police station for some cuddles. 

Happily for the rabbit, it was given an Easter reprieve and escaped euthanisation.

A local vet and the RSPCA helped rehome the bunny, which is now on its way to the Rabbit Rescue Sanctuary in New South Wales.

Kim Cooney, who works at the sanctuary, told the Guardian she hopped into action within 10 minutes of hearing the rabbit was in police custody. 

"My concern is only the rabbit," she said. "I try to rescue every rabbit that is in trouble in custody, either in a council pound in Queensland or the police station."

Queensland's state laws prohibit rabbit ownership as the animals damage local flora and fauna. Unauthorised rabbits can snare their owners fines of around $45,000 and six months' jail time.

Newshub.