Norway literally moves a mountain for ship tunnel

Scandinavia is widely recognised for its innovation and progressiveness - and Norway has confirmed that reputation with a first-of-a-kind tunnel that allows large ships to travel under a mountain.

The large-scale project, which is believed will take 12 years to complete, is finally ready for construction after more than 100 years of national debate - though the endeavour will cost a whopping $456 million.

The tunnel will be drilled 17km through the mountain at the base of the peninsula (Stad Skipstunnel)
The tunnel will be drilled 17km through the mountain at the base of the peninsula (Stad Skipstunnel)

The area is part of a much-used shipping route, and while it won't actually shorten any trips around Norway's remote Stad Peninsula, it will make it much safer.

The lives of 33 seamen have been lost in the region since World War II, and the tunnel will allow ships to avoid the notoriously dangerous waters around the peninsula, and instead travel through it.

The tunnel will change the normal shipping route but won't shorten the time it takes to traverse (Stad Skipstunnel)
The tunnel will change the normal shipping route but won't shorten the time it takes to traverse (Stad Skipstunnel)

The construction is scheduled to finish in 2029, and will burrow through 1700 metres of mountain. It will provide passage for 16,000-tonne passenger and freight ships.

The completed project will be another example of Norway's fine tunnelling exploits, following the construction of the globe's longest road tunnel at 25km.

Newshub.