New spider Califorctenus cacahilensi found in Baja California mine

Califorctenus cacahilensis (San Diego Natural History Museum)
Califorctenus cacahilensis (San Diego Natural History Museum)

Check out the newest member of the world's spider family. And to answer your first question, yes - it's venomous.

Califorctenus cacahilensi was found in an abandoned mine in Baja California, a peninsula on the western coast of Mexico.

Califorctenus cacahilensis (San Diego Natural History Museum)
Califorctenus cacahilensis (San Diego Natural History Museum)

Finder Jim Berrian of the San Diego Natural History Museum had trouble figuring out what it was at first, so consulted Mexican entomologist and southern spider expert Maria Jimenez, who confirmed it was new to science.

Mr Berriam played down the find, however.

"Discovering a species in entomology and arachnology is not terribly unusual. There might be another 2-2.5 million species of undiscovered insects and spiders."

Califorctenus cacahilensis egg mass (San Diego Natural History Museum)
Califorctenus cacahilensis egg mass (San Diego Natural History Museum)

What's unusual, however, is finding it in a place previously worked in by humans.

"It probably shows that there aren't enough entomologists and arachnologists looking for this stuff."

Califorctenus cacahilensi, about the size of a baseball, is detailed in the latest issue of journal Zootaxa.

Newshub.