One in 10 millennial grooms take their bride's name - study

Wedding
The survey found only 30 percent of grooms asked their fiancee's father for permission to marry their daughter. Photo credit: Getty

It's becoming increasingly common for men to take their wife's name, a new study in the UK has found.

In the millennial generation, one in 10 grooms now take their bride's surname, with only 72 percent of women taking their husband's. The rest either take on a double-barrelled surname or stick with their maiden names.

For couples over 55, 97 percent of women still take their husband's name.

The study was commissioned by the London Mint Office, which is issuing a commemorative coin to mark the 70th anniversary of the wedding of Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip.

It's believed Philip was opposed to Elizabeth's decision to keep the royal family surname of Windsor, rather than take his, which was Mountbatten.

"I'm just a bloody amoeba," he reportedly fumed. "I am the only man in the country not allowed to give his name to his own children."

They later settled on that most posh of compromises - their descendants through the male line would use the double-barrelled surname of Mountbatten-Windsor. Officially, the Mountbatten-Windsor surname is used by Princes Charles, William, George, Harry, Andrew and Edward and Princesses Charlotte, Beatrice, Eugenie and Anne, and a few others.

The survey of 2000 couples also found only 30 percent of grooms asked their fiancee's father for permission to marry their daughter, only 37 percent of young brides wore white and 8 percent have been to a wedding that descended into fighting.

Newshub.