Speeding the leading cause of car arguments - survey

And after speeding, the other common cause of car arguments include braking too late and too hard, taking unnecessary risks, and driving too cautiously.
And after speeding, the other common cause of car arguments include braking too late and too hard, taking unnecessary risks, and driving too cautiously. Photo credit: Pexels

There's nothing more frustrating than having a passenger in your car that's itching to criticise your every move.

"Slow down!", "Stop driving like an idiot!", "Why couldn't you just let them pass?"

But sometimes you just can't help but feel the need to speak up when the driver's putting your life at risk. When that happens, your survival instincts kick in, and before you know it, you've blurted out an insulting critique of someone's driving style. 

When that 'someone' is your partner, things can get ugly. And it just so happens that the leading cause of disagreements between couples in the car is speeding, according to a BuyaCar.co.uk survey of 1200 people in the UK. 

The study found that one in 10 people under 34 have had a go at their partner about their driving style, while a third of those over 55 have done so. And after speeding, the other common cause of car arguments include braking too late and too hard, taking unnecessary risks, and driving too cautiously. 

Couples also said they've fought with their partner because of their inability to switch lanes safely and also their partners' failing to keep a safe distance from the vehicle in front of them. 

"From the comments we received, it's fair to say that every kind of driving style, from fast and aggressive to thoughtful and careful comes in for criticism from the passenger, so taking a car journey together looks like a no-win for a lot of couples," said BuyaCar.co.uk managing director Austin Collins. 

While you might feel like a nag telling your partner to slow down or be more careful when switching lanes, it may be important to do so considering the number of deaths on New Zealand roads in 2017 was the highest it's been since 2009.  

The road toll has been increasing each year in New Zealand for the past five years, according to AA road safety spokesperson Dylan Thomsen. 

Newshub.

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