Gwyneth Paltrow calls fact-checking 'a pain', admits she doesn't do it on Goop

Paltrow says she "did not understand the problem" with not fact checking advice she gave on her site Goop.
Paltrow says she "did not understand the problem" with not fact checking advice she gave on her site Goop. Photo credit: Getty

Gwyneth Paltrow has gotten herself into hot water again over her wellness website Goop - or hot steam, as the case may be.

In a new interview with the New York Times, Paltrow says her partnership with possible publishers Condé Nast over a Goop magazine dissolved mostly because they wanted her to fact-check her articles. Horror!

"They're a company that's really in transition and do things in a very old-school way," the Shakespeare in Love actress said.

"But it was amazing to work with Anna [Wintour]. I love her. She's a total idol of mine.

"We realized we could just do a better job of it ourselves in-house. I think for us it was really like we like to work where we are in an expansive space. Somewhere like Condé, understandably, there are a lot of rules."

Since its launch in 2008, Goop has repeatedly come under fire for offering unhelpful and even potentially dangerous health and wellness advice. When pressed over lack of science, Paltrow said she "did not understand the problem".

"We're never making statements," she said.

However Paltrow then admitted she will be hiring a fact checker for Goop in September, which she deemed a "necessary growing pain". 

Earlier this year, a Spanish woman died after undergoing a repeated bee sting therapy Paltrow touted on Goop. In another article, Goop infamously wrote about a procedure called the "Mugworth V-Steam", in which people pay a practitioner to steam their vagina. The site claims: "It is an energetic release - not just a steam douche - that balances female hormone levels. If you're in LA, you have to do it."

Newshub. 

 

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