Gwyneth Paltrow's company Goop fined over bogus health claims

The "vaginal egg" products were advertised to "get better connected to the power within"
The "vaginal egg" products were advertised to "get better connected to the power within" Photo credit: Getty Images

Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop Inc. has agreed to pay $145,000 ($220,000) in civil penalties after California state officials argued a trio of products made bogus health claims.

The health company was forced to deny any wrong doing after the Food, Drug and Medical Device Task Force took action, stating Goop made 'unsubstantiated claims' about three health products.

The complaint claimed that the brand made false assurances about the Jade Egg, Rose Quartz Egg, and Inner Judge Flower Essence Blend that were "not supported by competent and reliable scientific evidence," a press release from the Orange County District Attorney's office said.

The Jade Egg (US$66), as currently displayed on Goop's website, says it is "used by women to increase sexual energy", while the Rose Quartz Egg (US$55) is "associated with positive energy and love".

"Goop advertised that the Jade and Rose Quartz eggs could balance hormones, regulate menstrual cycles, prevent uterine prolapse, and increase bladder control," the Orange County District Attorney's office said, E! News reported.

"Goop advertised that the Inner Judge Flower Essence Blend could help prevent depression."

The products are inserted by women into their vaginas and kept there for varying periods of time, sometimes overnight  to "get better connected to the power within".

In a statement Goop said the company wanted to settle the matter quickly and amicably.
In a statement Goop said the company wanted to settle the matter quickly and amicably. Photo credit: Getty Images

The company said there have not been any complaints about the product, but refunds will be issued should any customers request one. 

Orange County district attorney Tony Rackauckas said in a statement announcing the settlement it is important to hold companies accountable for unsubstantiated claims, "especially when the claims have the potential to affect women's health."

Erica Moore, Goop's chief financial officer, said in a statement that through a forum they produce, practioners are welcomed to express their views.

"The law, though, sometimes views statements like this as advertising claims, which are subjected to various legal requirements," she said.

"The Task Force assisted us in applying those laws to the content we published, and we appreciate their guidance in this matter as we move from a pioneer in the space to an established wellness authority."

In the court's decision, the company is also "barred from making any claims regarding the efficacy of its products without possessing competent and reliable scientific evidence, and from manufacturing or selling any misbranded, unapproved, or falsely-advertised medical devices," according to the press release.

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