Award-winning photographer Christopher Pearce reveals top tips on taking stunning photos of food

Award-winning food photographer Christopher Pearce shares his top tips and tricks to transform your food photos.
Award-winning food photographer Christopher Pearce shares his top tips and tricks to transform your food photos. Photo credit: Christopher Pearce/Instagram.

An award-winning food photographer has revealed his top tips on how to transform an average photo of a meal to stunning shot. 

Christopher Pearce has photographed for The Sydney Morning Herald's 'Good Food' section, various bistros and upmarket restaurants.  

Here are six of his best tips on how to take a professional photo: 

Lighting is key

"If you can use one directional light source coming across or behind your dish it will give your food form and make it more interesting to the eye," said Pearce.

He adds, light can come from the sun, window light or light in a restaurant. 

Try capturing shots from different perspectives

Pearce encourages food photographers not to be afraid of standing up from the table and taking the photo from overhead. 

"You will often get a more interesting graphic photo from above than from your seat," he explains. 

If you turn on the grid in your camera settings, he adds, it will indicate when your phone is completely level, to help you capture the perfect flat lay . 

Look for elements of design

He says, highlighting a simple element of design can add an extra dimension of interest and elevate a shot. 

Look for the circles of a plate, a straight-line edge of a table or texture of a table cloth.

Experiment using different lenses and angles

The food photographer highlights the importance of trying out different angles.

"Shoot up close to highlight detail or a standout feature of a dish or shoot with the wide lens to capture more in your shot to add the context of where you are."

Award-winning photographer Christopher Pearce reveals top tips on taking stunning photos of food
Photo credit: Christopher Pearce/Instagram.

Take a picture of a half-eaten dish

Sometimes a half-eaten dish can make a perfect shot.

"It often feels less staged and looks more interesting."

Don't forget to think about the video

Pearce says that if a dish or cocktail has a performative element to it, try taking a slow motion video to capture the drama.

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