Aussie mum of baby with port wine stain hits back at people calling her 'hideous' and a 'defect'

Aussie mum of baby with port wine stain hits back at bullies who called her daughter ‘hideous’ and a ‘defect’ – and even asked if her face had been ‘pushed onto a skillet’.
Photo credit: Caters News

A horrified Aussie mum has hit back at cruel bullies who asked if her daughter's face had been "pushed onto a skillet" and even said that her "hideous" baby could never get a boyfriend.

Marianna Bowering said she has always lovingly embraced her daughter's dark facial birthmark as a "unique addition to her beauty that should be celebrated".

The 27-year-old from Adelaide, Australia, explained that her daughter Angelica, aged one, was born with a port wine stain across her face - which she calls an 'angel kiss' due to its shape.

Marianna said that although most people in her life are loving and accepting of Angelica's birthmark, she does often receive hateful comments about it both in person and online.

Now, she hopes to raise awareness of the condition as well as calling out the bullies who have said nasty things about her daughter.

"The worst comment online that I've gotten is when someone asked if her face had been pushed onto a skillet. Basically, saying her face looked grilled," said Marianna.

"In person, I think the most hurtful thing was when someone at a soccer game told me that she was a 'defect'. He just said that to me and then walked away, I was shocked.

"I've gotten other comments from people saying things like she was hideous, that she would never get a boyfriend later in life and that I shouldn't have let her play with boiling water."

Aussie mum of baby with port wine stain hits back at bullies who called her daughter ‘hideous’ and a ‘defect’ – and even asked if her face had been ‘pushed onto a skillet’.
Photo credit: Caters News

Marianna also said people have told her not to share photos of her daughter.

"People have told me I shouldn't draw attention to her face," she said.

"Why can't she have an Instagram page without adults bullying her online? It's ridiculous.

"They are literally bullying a baby. She is not even two yet, it is disgusting behaviour.

"I don't care what anyone says though. I would never hide my little girl because of it, I think she is absolutely stunning."

Marianna explained that while some insults were obvious, there were times when strangers in public would say things to her that were simply thoughtless or insensitive.

"I think some people are in denial about the stain, they think it will fade over time," she said.

"The thing I hate most is when people tell me she can just cover it with make-up when she's older. Why should she cover it up? If she wants to flaunt it, she can.

"The other comment that annoys me is when people see her and tell me not to worry because she is 'still beautiful'. It is such a back-handed compliment."

Port wine stains, also known as capillary malformations, are permanent red or blue-coloured birthmarks that are present from birth.

Aussie mum of baby with port wine stain hits back at bullies who called her daughter ‘hideous’ and a ‘defect’ – and even asked if her face had been ‘pushed onto a skillet’.
Photo credit: Caters News

Marianna said that while she and her husband Corey, 27, did not care about the physical appearance of the skin condition, the couple had no idea that port wine stains could indicate other health concerns such as development delays, seizures and – because the stain was covering her eyes – glaucoma.

Thankfully, Angelica is healthy as can be and will undergo regular check-ups to ensure there are no health concerns arising from her port wine stain.

"When she was born, I knew that she had a port wine stain, but I had no idea of all the other health concerns that could arise from it," said Marianna.

"It was quite overwhelming to learn of these extra things that could go along with a port wine stain. But she is doing so well, and we couldn't be prouder of her."

Marianna added that as her daughter grows up, she wants to instill in her that her port wine stain is what makes her beautiful and unique – while also helping to raise awareness of the condition in the community.

"I think it's important to help raise awareness of the condition while also normalising it on our community," she said.

"We rarely see people with these kinds of differences in the mainstream media.

"I do worry about what she might go through during her school years.  But I really hope by that time that there might be more awareness and education about people's differences.

"It breaks my heart to think about anyone being mean to her. But I see her now, and she is such a confident little girl and she isn't afraid of anything.

"I am sure she is going to get through anything life throws at her. She is more than her birthmark. She is her own person, and she is not different to anyone else.

"It's her superhero mask. She wears her heart on her face."

Caters News

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