Ngāpuhi divided ahead of Waitangi Day

Ngāpuhi elder Kingi Taurua speaks at Waitangi at Te Tii Marae in 2012.
Ngāpuhi elder Kingi Taurua speaks at Waitangi at Te Tii Marae in 2012. Photo credit: Getty

A divided iwi will  put on a brave face with Waitangi Day commemorations just around the corner.

Te Tii Marae has temporarily lost its hosting rights for celebrations in favour of the Upper Treaty Grounds, after an attempt to charge media $10,000 to broadcast last year.

Ngāpuhi elder Kingi Taurua says his iwi is the most divided it's ever been.

"The division in Ngāpuhi is certainly very rife. Visitors ask me 'why is Ngāpuhi so divided', and I say we've always been divided. This division is starting to hurt.

"Each one has their own view of what should happen, some are talking about settlement, some are talking about compensation.

"It's going to be very very difficult. If we can't work together for Waitangi Day, we will never be able to work together for settlement. There are some here who say 'we are not going to settle, we want compensation'."

Te Tii Marae has traditionally been seen as the Waitangi Day starting point where people can voice their concerns.

Kingi Taurua says the Government has a tall task ahead if it hopes to mends relations within the tribe.

Newshub.