Kiwi scientists lead search for Loch Ness monster

Scientists from around the globe will head to Loch Ness in June to start the research.
Scientists from around the globe will head to Loch Ness in June to start the research. Photo credit: Getty

An Otago scientist equipped with a special set of DNA is out to discover if the long-fabled Loch Ness Monster is actually real.

A group of international scientists led by University of Otago Professor Neil Gemmell will use tiny environmental DNA remnants, which he calls "animal dandruff", left behind in the lake.

From this scientists will be able to establish all living life in Loch Ness, and make comparisons between it and other loch's. 

However the project is far more than just a hunt for the infamous monster. 

"While the prospect of looking for evidence of the Loch Ness monster is the hook to this project, there is an extraordinary amount of new knowledge that we will gain from the work about organisms that inhabit Loch Ness - the UK's largest freshwater body," Prof Gemmell says.

He predicts the team will find new species of life - particularly new bacteria.

The research will start in June this year.

Newshub.