Controversial cartoonist under fire for offensive cartoon

Published in Fairfax newspapers on Monday, Mr Nisbet's cartoon responds to the government's family package, which came into effect yesterday.
Published in Fairfax newspapers on Monday, Mr Nisbet's cartoon responds to the government's family package, which came into effect yesterday. Photo credit: Fairfax

Controversial cartoonist Al Nisbet has once again come under fire for an offensive cartoon.

Published in Fairfax newspapers on Monday, Mr Nisbet's cartoon responds to the government's family package, which came into effect yesterday.

The multibillion-dollar scheme will give 384,000 families extra money in the back pocket through changes to Working for Families, the Best Start payment to families of newborn babies, winter energy payments for beneficiaries, and extended paid parental leave at a higher pay rate.

Mr Nisbet's cartoon portrays a poor family neglecting their three children to "try for triplets" in order to receive more money from the government. It also claims the tattooed parents spend their money on alcohol and cigarettes.

Some Twitter users expressed their disdain at Mr Nisbet's cartoon.

"This is vile," one user said.

"You'd think that only people who've never had kids could believe that family subsidies make child rearing profitable but you'd be surprised at just how stupid people can be," wrote another.

Others stood up for the cartoonist, with one man writing "So accurate. Good on him." 

Mr Nisbet's controversial cartoons have often attracted complaints for their racist, sexist, and classist nature.

In 2013, one of his cartoons was brought before the Press Council, but it decided not to act on the complaints.

The cartoon showed a family of Māori or Pacific Island adults discussing how they'd have more cash for "booze, smokes and pokies" when the food in schools programme started.

At the time Mr Nisbet said he was "just trying to be funny" and wanted to provoke a reaction - whether good or bad.

Newshub.