No forensic evidence 'red flag' in Gail Maney case - Tim McKinnel

A key figure in clearing Teina Pora of his rape and murder convictions has set his sights on getting another case re-heard.

Gail Maney was handed a life sentence after she was convicted of the 1989 murder of west Aucklander Deane Fuller-Sandys.

However, she's maintained her innocence ever since.

After true crime podcast Gone Fishing explored the case, a campaign to take another look at her conviction gained traction.

Criminal barrister Julie-Anne Kincade, Nicholas Chisnall and Aieyah Shendi will represent Maney in an attempt to get her case re-heard by the Court of Appeal.

Tim McKinnel, a private investigator, says the evidence needs to be looked at again.

"I followed the podcast and it really piqued my interest. I was aware of the case before that, but I didn't know much about it."

Tim McKinnel says the lack of forensic evidence is a major red flag.
Tim McKinnel says the lack of forensic evidence is a major red flag. Photo credit: The AM Show

It was claimed that Maney ordered a hit on Fuller-Sandys after he allegedly broke into her home.

However, she says she never met him.

Mr McKinnel says the lack of forensic evidence is a major red flag.

"A number of witnesses said they saw the murder but there are very serious questions about what exactly happened.

"The claim is that multiple shots were fired in a very small space and there's no forensic or physical evidence to support that."

Mr McKinnel says while Maney is out of prison now, parole is not freedom.

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