Proposed Bill to restrict use of word 'teacher'

Proposed Bill to restrict use of word 'teacher'
Photo credit: Getty

A Bill which would make it illegal to use the title 'teacher' without a formal qualification is before a select committee.

But the Opposition fears it will "undermine and devalue" those tutors and educators who fall outside the criteria.

Submissions for The Education (Protecting Teacher Title) Amendment Bill, fronted by New Zealand First MP Jenny Marcroft, closed on Friday.

It aims to "lift the status of teachers" by removing the ability of those without the qualification to represent themselves with that title.

"Clarity around the use of the title of teacher is essential in order to avoid any misunderstanding by the public about the qualifications," the proposed Bill reads.

It would become an offence, punishable with a $2000 fine, to connect the word with any unqualified person or business.

Qualifications which could use the title are a three-year Bachelor of Education, a Bachelor's degree with a one-year Diploma of Teaching, or a conjoint degree that combines study in teaching subjects with teacher training.

Those who aren't qualified can still use the titles of lecturer, tutor or educator.

But National education spokesperson Nikki Kaye says the Bill "jeopardises many of our current teachers and early childhood teachers".

"It has the potential to undermine and devalue our many educators who contribute to the wellbeing of our country.

"The impact of the Bill is not even isolated to the education sector. Are we going to fine every music teacher, dance teacher, and swimming teacher?"

Ms Kaye estimates it will affect "thousands of people".

"Even the Attorney-General has come out against the bill as it breaches the Bill of Rights, yet the Government continues to support it."

But Ms Marcroft says it's "nonsense" that there's currently no differentiation between those that have "significant skills and training" and those who don't.

"If we are going to have strong partnerships with whānau and communities to improve the educational outcomes of all tamariki, we must ensure the professional status of teachers is recognised," she says.

"The Bill will elevate the public status of teachers and provide parents with a clear distinction between teachers who are fully trained and qualified, and those who are not."

Newshub.

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