Budget 2019: How the Government's divided up its funding

The Government says its Wellbeing Budget will for the first time prioritise people's wellbeing alongside economic growth.

Here's how the Government has divided up its funding:

Mental health funding

  • $455.1 million over four years for a new frontline service for mental health
  • $40 million over four years for suicide prevention services
  • $20.8 million over four years to fund digital and tele health services
  • $58 million in operating funding for treating drug and alcohol addiction
  • $200 million ring-fenced in capital for DHBs to fund new and existing mental health and addiction services, which is part of a total $213.1 million from the $2.3 billion for DHBs
  • $4 million over four years for Te Ara in Northland, an initiative with police which provides meth addiction support
  • $8 million over four years to improve responses for people who turn up at hospital emergency departments needing mental health support
  • $128.3 million over four years to expand mental health and other services related to alcohol and drugs for offenders
  • $6 million to support families of homicide victims to help their mental health
  • $197 million to tackle homelessness through Housing First

Funding for families/child poverty reduction

  • $265.6 million over four years for schools to replace parental donations
  • $26 million over four years for NGO partners to provide early intervention services
  • $524 million over four years for new National Care Standards which come into force in July
  • $70 million to provide things like toys, laptops, books and sports equipment and specialist health resources for children in care
  • $153.7 million to establish a new service to "support young people to transition successfully from care and youth justice services into adulthood"
  • Removing $70.70 NCEA fee (already announced)
  • $131.1 million in operating funding over four years to subsidise early childhood education - this is on top of $105 million provided in Budget 2018
  • $47.6 million for a programme to promote healthy eating
  • $320.2 million over four years as part of an "overhaul of the welfare system" to index main benefits to average wage increases. Currently, benefits are indexed to the Consumer Price Index
  • $320 million package to support family and violence and sexual support services
Budget 2019: How the Government's divided up its funding

Christchurch terror attack

  • $150 million operating for firearms buy-back scheme
  • $11 million in operating for NZSIS
  • $39 million operating for GCSB
  • $3 million Initial Health Response operating

Education funding

  • $1.2 billion for new schools and classrooms for the next 10 years
  • $286.8 million is the first wave to build new schools
  • $913 million to allow the Ministry of Education, schools and communities to plan for growth over 10 years
  • $235 million over four years for early childhood education
  • $1.7 billion for hospitals and facilities over two years - $850 million each year
  • $2.9 billion over the next five years for DHBs, including $40 million for PHARMAC
  • $36 million investment in the National Bowel Screening Programme
  • $464 million over four years for Disability Support Services
Budget 2019: How the Government's divided up its funding

Investing in New Zealand

  • The Government's increased the rolling four-year capital allowance announced in December 2018 by $1.7 billion to $14.8 billion
  • Budget 2019 is the first time the Government has used a multi-year allowance for capital investments
  • $1.7 billion investment in hospitals and facilities over the next two years - $850 million each year
  • $2.9 billion over the next five years for DHBs, including $40 million for PHARMAC
  • The National Bowel Screening Programme will roll out to four more DHBs with a $36 million investment
  • $464 million to Disability Support Services over four years.
  • Dunedin Hospital will be fully funded, but the cost is still up in the air as waiting on business case
Budget 2019: How the Government's divided up its funding


Funding for Māori

  • $80 million for Whanau Ora over four years
  • $10 million over four years for the Māori Language Commission to support the goal of basic Te Reo Māori being spoken by 1 million people by 2040
  • $14 million of additional support for Te Mangai Paho for Māori programming
  • $6 million invested in the Kahui investment model run by Te Matawai
  • $26.6 million via Provincial Growth Fund to extend He Poutama Rangatahi to help those not in employment, education or training and those at risk of long-term unemployment
  • $56.1 million over four years for the Whenua Maori Programme to unlock potential of Maori-owned land which includes setting up an advisory service
Budget 2019: How the Government's divided up its funding

Pacific investment

  • $20 million over four years for the Ministry for Pacific Peoples to establish a Pacific Language Unit to ensure the survival of the Pacific languages
  • $27.4 million over four years to ensure Pacific students can pursue education
  • $14.5 million to the Ministry for Pacific Peoples to grow opportunities for young people
  • $11 million over four years to boost the Pacific Business Trust

Māori and Pacific health

  • $12 million for rheumatic fever programmes to reduce rates among Māori and Pacific
  • $1 million for research into a whanau-centred approach to primary healthcare
  • $9.8 million over four years to develop Pacific community initiatives
  • $14.3 million over four years to help increase the number of Pacific people in the health workforce by strengthening Pacific training pathways

Crime funding

  • $98 million toward kaupapa Māori and whanau-centred approach with Corrections (from pre-sentence to re-integration), including $35 million over four years to apply a Whanau Ora approach to reduce reoffending

Funding for a 'productive nation'

  • $300 million to help fill a 'capital gap' and for start-ups to keep them in the country longer
  • $240 million earmarked for the NZ Super Fund over four years and $60 million from the NZ Venture Investment Fund's existing assets
  • All funds will be returned to the Crown after 15 years to fund NZ Super
  • $157 million over four years for innovation to help businesses become more productive - includes $26 million to develop and grow start-ups
  • $3.5 million to help equip school-leavers for life after school including how to enrol to vote, apply for a mortgage, save for a mortgage and write a CV
  • $49.9 million boost for Mana in Mahi, extending placements from 150 to 2000 to eventually 400
  • $197 million leftover from the Fees Free going toward reform of vocational education (already announced)
Budget 2019: How the Government's divided up its funding

'Transforming the economy'

  • Over $1 billion boost in funding for KiwiRail to support its redevelopment
  • $375 million for new wagons and locomotives
  • $331 million for track and other supporting infrastructure
  • $35 million to begin the process of replacing ferries and begin the process of replacing the Interislander ferries
  • $300 million from PGF in investment for regional rail initiatives
  • $405.5 million to cover the Crown's share of forecast cost increases to build the Auckland City Rail Link.


'The Productive and Sustainable Land Use package'

  • $229.2 million package to provide more support for farmers and councils to improve land use practices, and to protect and restore at risk waterways and wetlands
  • $40 million from the PGF towards projects in the waste sector and projects in the energy sector
  • $8.5 million reduce agricultural emissions
  • $27 million to set up the National New Energy Development Centre in Taranaki (already announced)
  • $20 million over four years to fund research into the likes of solar, superconductors, nano technologies and inductive power
  • $49 million to help transform the forestry sector - combined with existing funding it equates to $58 million in Te Uru Rakau (Forestry New Zealand)
  • $4 million over four years to help the Ministry for the Environment work on improving recycling
  • $18 million over four years to help innovate products and technologies that turn low value biological waste streams into new high value products and grow exports

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