The reason behind planting roses at the end of vineyards

A rose growing at the of end of grapevine rows is a common sight on vineyards in New Zealand and around the world.

However while they add a splash of colour, the story behind the tradition is a practical one.

Winemaker at Palliser Estate in Martinborough Guy McMaster, told Magic Talk that the roses played an important role, helping alert winemakers to possible trouble on the vines.

"The roses were always a good indicator of disease," he said.

"People would often wander to the end of the row and have a look at the rose," said McMaster.

Guy McMaster is chief viticulturist and winemaker at Palliser Estate Winery.
Guy McMaster is chief viticulturist and winemaker at Palliser Estate Winery. Photo credit: Supplied

He said if the rose plant was diseased it would ring alarm bells.

"It would always hit the roses, before it hit the vines."

However he said times had changed.

"Nowadays, viticulturists wander down the whole row, they keep a very good eye on what is happening on the vineyard."

Meanwhile McMaster said it had been a good season for the area's vineyards, despite some weather challenges.

"Generally, it was a fantastic year, some vineyards did get affected by some frost damage, which bought yields back."

However he said the weather was kind for the grape harvest.

"The settled weather in March and April allowed us to pick whenever we wanted to, so the fruit was clean and the wine looks very smart."

Newshub.

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