Football World Cup: Mexican fans cause artificial quake against Germany

Mexico's win over Germany at the Football World Cup may have sent shockwaves through the footballing world, but it apparently caused real ones in Mexico City.

Hirving Lozano scored in the 35th minute against the reigning champions, sparking mass celebrations among the millions of fans watching back home.

The celebrations caused two artificial quakes in Mexico's capital, according to a Mexican seismic monitoring network.

It was said the shock was "possibly caused by massive jumps during the goal from the Mexico national soccer team". 

For Mexico, it was a dream game, as they beat Germany for just the second time.          

"I don't know if it's the biggest victory in [Mexico's] history, but one of the biggest for sure," Germany coach Joachim Lozano said after the game.       

History is against Germany with two pool games reaming - three of the previous four world champions have failed to make it out of World Cup group stages.

Last November, Peru activated earthquake detection software in Lima, as fans celebrated Jefferson Farfan's goal against World Cup play-off rivals New Zealand.

Newshub.