Stunning images showcase Japan's amazing fireworks displays

PIC BY MAKOTO IGARI / CATERS - (Pictured: Akagawa Fireworks Display, Tsuruoka City, Yamagata Prefecture) - This incredible kaleidoscopic images showcase the sheer beauty of the mammoth firework displays that take place across Japan every summer. Photographer Makoto Igari has spent the last three years diligently pursuing such firework festivals across his homeland, with the Japanese themselves calling fireworks hanabi, meaning fire flower. Included in 32-year-old Makotos works were the likes of rainbow-coloured bursts, exploding over vast crowds; displays bright enough to illuminate the cities below; and works of incredible symmetry. Each year, local governments in Japan throw around 7,000 festivals, called Hanabi Taikai. - SEE CATERS COPY
Photo credit: Caters/Makoto Igari

Photographer and fireworks fanatic Makoto Igari has spent the last three years travelling Japan capturing the country's best fireworks displays.

Originally used to ward off evil spirits, the Japanese call fireworks "hanabi", which translates to English as "fire flower." 

PIC BY MAKOTO IGARI / CATERS - (Pictured: Tamamura Fireworks Display, Tamamura Town, Gunma Prefecture) - This incredible kaleidoscopic images showcase the sheer beauty of the mammoth firework displays that take place across Japan every summer. Photographer Makoto Igari has spent the last three years diligently pursuing such firework festivals across his homeland, with the Japanese themselves calling fireworks hanabi, meaning fire flower. Included in 32-year-old Makotos works were the likes of rainbow-coloured bursts, exploding over vast crowds; displays bright enough to illuminate the cities below; and works of incredible symmetry. Each year, local governments in Japan throw around 7,000 festivals, called Hanabi Taikai. - SEE CATERS COPY
Photo credit: Caters/Makoto Igari

Among Igari's photos are rainbow-coloured displays exploding over vast crowds and explosions of incredible symmetry.

Local authorities in Japan arrange over 7000 fireworks festivals, or Hanabi Taikai, every year.

PIC BY MAKOTO IGARI / CATERS - (Pictured: Tsuchiura National Fireworks Competition, Tsuchiura City, Ibaraki Prefecture) - This incredible kaleidoscopic images showcase the sheer beauty of the mammoth firework displays that take place across Japan every summer. Photographer Makoto Igari has spent the last three years diligently pursuing such firework festivals across his homeland, with the Japanese themselves calling fireworks hanabi, meaning fire flower. Included in 32-year-old Makotos works were the likes of rainbow-coloured bursts, exploding over vast crowds; displays bright enough to illuminate the cities below; and works of incredible symmetry. Each year, local governments in Japan throw around 7,000 festivals, called Hanabi Taikai. - SEE CATERS COPY
Photo credit: Caters/Makoto Igari

The events attract hundreds of thousands of people who often wear traditional garments as part of the celebrations.

Unlike most countries in the world, Japan's major fireworks displays happen in July and August, not on New Year's Eve. The firework shows typically start some time after sunset and last one to two hours. 

PIC BY MAKOTO IGARI / CATERS - (Pictured: Star Island, Daiba, Minato Ward Tokyo Prefecture) - This incredible kaleidoscopic images showcase the sheer beauty of the mammoth firework displays that take place across Japan every summer. Photographer Makoto Igari has spent the last three years diligently pursuing such firework festivals across his homeland, with the Japanese themselves calling fireworks hanabi, meaning fire flower. Included in 32-year-old Makotos works were the likes of rainbow-coloured bursts, exploding over vast crowds; displays bright enough to illuminate the cities below; and works of incredible symmetry. Each year, local governments in Japan throw around 7,000 festivals, called Hanabi Taikai. - SEE CATERS COPY
Photo credit: Caters/Makoto Igari

Igari is also known for his amazing images of cherry blossoms in spring time.

Caters/Newshub