Virgin Australia installs fuel saving winglets on its Boeing 737 fleet

The small change makes a massive difference to the airlines expenses.
The small change makes a massive difference to the airlines expenses. Photo credit: Virgin Australia

Virgin Australia has begun installing new winglets designed to save fuel on its Boeing 737 aircraft.

This makes them the first Australian airline to use the 'split scimitar winglets' which improve fuel efficiency by reducing the amount of drag created by the aircraft wingtips.

The reduction in drag means less fuel is used, and less carbon is released while achieving the same speed and performance levels.

 

This also means the aircraft can fly further without increasing the amount of fuel needed.

The winglets are being retro-fitted to five of Virgin Australia's Boeing 737 NG aircraft which operate between Fiji, Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific.

The winglets could save the airline approximately 160,000 kilograms of fuel.
The winglets could save the airline approximately 160,000 kilograms of fuel. Photo credit: Virgin Australia

“We've estimated the winglets will save us, approximately 160,000 kilograms of fuel, which equates to 200,000 litres and a reduction in carbon dioxide emissions of approximately 515 tonnes, per aircraft, per year. That's the equivalent of planting 7,725 trees, just from one aircraft's annual savings," Virgin Australia's Stuart Aggs said

The wingtip technology is designed by company Aviation Partners Boeing, and is used by airlines around the world to improve aircraft efficiency.

Newshub.

 

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