US students protesting for gun control won't lose college places

Just 10 days after the deadly Florida school shooting, teenagers are calling for gun reform by staging protests and walk-outs.
Just 10 days after the deadly Florida school shooting, teenagers are calling for gun reform by staging protests and walk-outs. Photo credit: Getty

Universities around the United States are pledging they won't rescind places for high school students who are suspended while protesting for gun control.

Just 10 days after the deadly Florida school shooting, teenagers are calling for gun reform by staging protests and walk-outs.

Many of those students are being dealt harsh punishments by their high schools, including threats of suspension.

"We will discipline no matter if it is 1, 50, or 500 students involved. All will be suspended for three days and parent notes will not alleviate the discipline," read a note sent home by the superintendent of the Needville Independent School District, which is just outside Houston, Texas.

However, this threat has lost its sting thanks to universities who are standing up for the high schoolers, promising not to rescind placement offers on the basis of suspension.

More than 50 colleges have released statements letting teenagers know they won't be penalised if they get suspended for protesting.

"Here at Yale, we are proud to support all students for participating in peaceful walkouts for gun control or other causes, and we will not rescind admissions decisions for students who do so regardless of any school's disciplinary policy," wrote Yale University on Twitter.

"Students disciplined by your high schools for joining in responsible anti-gun protests - you won't get your admission rescinded at MIT," wrote MIT Director Joi Ito. 

"Dartmouth supports active citizenship and applauds students' expression of their beliefs. Participation in peaceful protest in no way jeopardizes your admission to Dartmouth, even if you are disciplined or suspended. Speak your truth," Dartmouth College shared. 

Newshub.