Children vandalise ancient rocks formed 200 million years ago in England

North Yorkshire Police said five youths were seen causing a rock to fall from the top of one of the formations, damaging the hill face.
North Yorkshire Police said five youths were seen causing a rock to fall from the top of one of the formations, damaging the hill face. Photo credit: AAP

A group of kids have been seen vandalising rock formations in the UK formed around 200 million years ago. 

The unique rock formations stand at a height of almost 10 metres in the North York Moors, a National park in North Yorkshire, England. But one of the balancing stones has been toppled from its perch by a group of kids, Metro reports. 

The rocks are stacked in various formations, caused by millstone grit being eroded by water, glaciation and wind. Some amazing shapes have been formed and named for visitors to spot, including the Sphinx, the Watchdog, the Turtle and the Dancing Bear. 

But in early June, North Yorkshire Police said five youths were seen causing a rock to fall from the top of one of the formations, damaging the hill face. The damage has been described as "irreplaceable" and the area is now "potentially dangerous". 

"The incident has not only caused considerable damage to both the rock and the crag face, but those responsible also put themselves in danger and have created a potential hazard for other visitors to Brimham Rocks," said Helen Clarke from the National Trust. 

Rocks close to where the vandalism took place appear to have names scratched into them - potentially by the same youths who caused the damage. 

The geology of the North York Moors contains rocks of the Jurassic period, laid down 205 to 142 million years ago, according to experts. 

The North York Moors became a national park in 1952.

Newshub.