Children's book character 'Mr Clever' accused of 'mansplaining'

The joke follows a pun about the river Forth in Scotland.
The joke follows a pun about the river Forth in Scotland. Photo credit: Shelby Judge/Twitter

A conversation between a kids book character Mr Clever and Little Miss Curious has been described as 'mansplaining'.

Shelby Judge a PhD student at the University of Glasgow posted a photo of the book page on Twitter captioning the post "Mr. Mansplain #EverydaySexism."

The term 'mansplaining’ first appeared in 2008.

The phrase is an expression used when a male informs another gender how to do something they already know how to do. 

The joke follows a pun about the river Forth in Scotland. 

Miss Curious wonders what happened to the First, second and the Third bridges, Mr Clever explains it was named after the River Forth.

The female character then asks Mr Clever what happened to the 'First', 'Second' and 'Third' river.

"Mr Clever sighed. It was going to be a long day." 

The 24-year-old English literature student found the book at a Stirling Castle in Scotland. She told The Telegraph the books are using Mr Men to enforce 'ridiculous' and 'antiquated' gender roles.

"It's meant to be a funny joke, but then it's always at the expense of women.  It's punching down. You don't have to joke at the expense of anyone, there's just no need."

The Mr Men books originally written by Roger Hargreaves were first published in 1971.  

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