Former PM Key used in fake get-rich-quick story

John Key is used to sell the scheme which "99.9 percent" of people don't know about (wolfofcoinstreet)
John Key is used to sell the scheme which "99.9 percent" of people don't know about (wolfofcoinstreet)

Former Prime Minister John Key's image is being used as the face of a get-rich-quick scheme which appears on at least one online news website.

It sells the "secret loophole" where "Kiwis can earn $750 per day and quit their jobs" and features an image of Mr Key holding up a sheet of new $10 bills at the Reserve Bank.

The story also includes one of Mr Key's "top lawyers" who conveniently "prefers to remain anonymous" - as well as an image of broadcaster Paul Henry

The story also uses a promotional image of Paul Henry (wolfofcoinstreet)
The story also uses a promotional image of Paul Henry (wolfofcoinstreet)

While Mr Key did resign from his role as Prime Minister in December and gave his valedictory speech in Parliament last month it is safe to say his new gig is not promoting this highly dubious scheme.

"John Key is sending shockwaves throughout all of New Zealand by revealing his secret formula that the average citizen is using to make fast money from home," the fake article reads.

"We're literally seeing an increase in self-employment. Never before in history do we have an opportunity that people can easily take advantage of to generate tremendous wealth in such a short time," it quotes him as saying.

Nowhere in the article does it mention Mr Key was the Prime Minister, though it does quote his "lawyer" as saying he was a "prominent figure".

Newshub came across the 'Wolf of Coin Street' article on Australia's 7 News website, but it is likely it will also appear on a number of other websites.

In his last full year as Prime Minister, Mr Key earned $1229 a day - much more than the $750 the story trumpets - with an annual salary of $448,569.

He made his early fortunes as an investment banker, and last year NBR ranked him 175th in the top 200 richest New Zealanders list with an estimated $60 million net worth.

Mr Henry's picture, a Paul Henry Show promotional photo, is also used to sell an "auto trading phenomenon" to get rich.

The Government has been contacted for comment.

Newshub.

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