David Bain selling Christchurch home

David Bain and wife Liz Davies are selling their Christchurch home, with the real estate ad saying the couple "must move".

The three-bedroom, one-bathroom Casebrook unit is for sale with an asking price of $415,000.

The Casebrook property (Trade Me)
The Casebrook property (Trade Me)

The couple, who married in 2014, seem to be giving up a nice property on a quiet cul-de-sac, with an open plan living and dining area, a conservatory and outdoor entertainment area.

The Trade Me listing also trumpets the nearby cafes, parks and close to the city centre and Northlands Mall.

(Trade Me)
(Trade Me)

It is under Ms Davies' name.

The listing provides a contact for a man named Will, who told Fairfax Media he was selling it on behalf of a woman, but wouldn't discuss any more details.

(Trade Me)
(Trade Me)

Last year, Mr Bain accepted a $925,000 ex-gratia payment from the Government following his long, convoluted and ultimately unsuccessful path to compensation.

At the time, Justice Minister Amy Adams said the payment was "in recognition of the time involved and expenses incurred by Mr Bain during the compensation process and the desirability of avoiding further litigation".

(Trade Me)
(Trade Me)

Mr Bain was first found guilty of the murder of his five family members in May 1995 and jailed for life with a minimum term of 16 years.

After years of legal battles, he was granted a retrial in 2007. The 2009 trial saw him acquitted of killing his parents Robin and Margaret, sisters Laniet and Awara and brother Stephen.

That acquittal saw the battle move from the courtroom into Parliament, where in 2010 then Justice Minister Judith Collins rejected a report into the case by retired Canadian Supreme Court judge Justice Ian Binnie following a number of errors.

In 2013, Mr Bain's lawyer Michael Reed QC announced a judicial review of Ms Collins' decision.

After two years, Ms Adams announced that review had ended following an agreement between parties.

Former Australian High Court judge Ian Callinan QC was then brought in to review Mr Bain's compensation claim.

He found him not "innocent beyond reasonable doubt", meaning he wouldn't meet the criteria for compensation.

Newshub.