Woman and gorilla bond over video on phone

Ms Costello said the gorilla loved watching the video and indicated that it wanted to see more.
Ms Costello said the gorilla loved watching the video and indicated that it wanted to see more. Photo credit: Instagram/ Lindsey Costello

A US woman and a gorilla watched a video of baby gorillas together on her phone, and the moment was caught on camera.

Lindsey Costello posted the photo from the Kentucky zoo to Instagram with the caption: "My new friend and I enjoy watching videos of baby gorillas."

Ms Costello said the gorilla was loving the video and used its hand to indicate it wanted to see more.

Gorillas are well known for their gentle human like behaviour, however all four gorilla subspecies are either endangered or critically endangered.

They're threatened by hunting for bushmeat, habitat loss, wildlife trade and infectious diseases. Ironically cell phones are responsible for some of the gorilla's lost natural habitat, when forests are cleared to make way for mining for coltan - used to make electronic products.

Many gorilla populations have declined or have completely disappeared in the past few decades. There are less than one thousand mountain gorillas remaining, and less than 300 cross river gorillas. WWF currently estimates that by 2030 less than 10 percent of the gorilla habitat in Africa will be left undisturbed.

Estimated gorilla populations according to WWF:

  • Western lowland gorilla: The most widespread subspecies, with an estimated 100,000.
  • Cross river gorilla: The world's rarest great ape, with a population of 250-300 in a small area of forest on the Cameroon and Nigeria border.
  • Eastern lowland gorilla: Its population has plummeted in recent decades, there are now less than 4,000.
  • Mountain gorilla: There are around 880 remaining members of this subspecies.

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