Oxford University admits more women than men for the first time

For the first time in its 1000-year history, Oxford has admitted more women than men.
For the first time in its 1000-year history, Oxford has admitted more women than men. Photo credit: Getty

In 2017, the University of Oxford offered more undergraduate places to women than men for the first time in history.

Roughly 1070 female school leavers from the UK took places on the prestigious university's undergraduate course for autumn 2017. This number narrowly beats the 1025 males of the same age who took places.

Among undergraduate applicants to Oxford of all ages, women received more offers to study than men despite fewer women applying than their male counterparts. 

Oxford is the oldest university in the English-speaking world, existing in some form since 1096.

It only began accepting female students in 1974, when one of its 38 all-male colleges began admitting women. The rest of Oxford's campuses began to follow suit throughout the 1970s and 1980s. 

Cambridge, Oxford's rival university, offered slightly more undergraduate places to male school leavers than female in 2017. However, it made more offers to British women older than 18 - although fewer women accepted their offers to study at Cambridge than men.

The results were published by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) on Thursday (local time). 

Newshub.