How to vote from overseas

New Zealanders currently traveling or living overseas can now cast their votes for the 2017 General Election.

For those keen to have their say in the makeup of the next Government, voting from overseas is incredibly simple, especially if you're already enrolled.

The easiest way to vote from overseas is to download and print your voting papers.

Not sure who to vote for? Check out some policies:

The two papers you'll be printing out will be your special vote declaration and your ballot paper, which is your actual vote.

You just need to follow these five steps

1. Head to the electoral commission website and download the voting forms here 

2. Print the two forms out

3. Sign the special vote declaration form in front of a witness, who will also need to sign the form

4. Take clear photographs of the forms or scan them

5. Upload the forms to the website using a computer or smart phone

If you are living overseas and you're a New Zealand citizen, to be eligible to vote you must have been to New Zealand within the past three years.

If you're a permanent resident, you must have been in New Zealand within the past year.

Other ways to vote from overseas

1. Vote in person at the nearest overseas post - or post your vote to them.

You can see a list of overseas posts from which you can vote here.

2. Ask to be sent voting papers by post. Send your full name, date of birth, email and/or phone number, New Zealand address where you are enrolled to vote and overseas address where you want your voting papers to be sent in the mail to overseas@elections.org.nz or by post to Electoral Commission, PO Box 3220, Wellington 6140, NEW ZEALAND 

You need to return the papers by scanning and uploading to the website, or by fax (+64 4 494 2300) or post.

3. If you're in Australia, there will be plenty of voting options - they open all their electoral commission offices for New Zealanders to vote.

New Zealanders voting from overseas will be enrolled in the electorate they last lived in for a month or longer.

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Poverty has become an increasing concern for New Zealand. UNICEF says that right now, one in four children live in poverty.

Families with young children are seen as being particularly at-risk for falling into hardship.

Families who are in work but struggling to make ends meet are being targeted by Labour and National with tax credits through Working for Families.

Who should I vote for? Poverty policy at a glance
 
 
 
 
 
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Poverty has become an increasing concern for New Zealand. UNICEF says that right now, one in four children live in poverty.

Families with young children are seen as being particularly at-risk for falling into hardship.

Families who are in work but struggling to make ends meet are being targeted by Labour and National with tax credits through Working for Families.

Who should I vote for? Poverty policy at a glance
 
 
 
 
 
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Credits: Image: Newshub Video: Newshub

Poverty has become an increasing concern for New Zealand. UNICEF says that right now, one in four children live in poverty.

Families with young children are seen as being particularly at-risk for falling into hardship.

Families who are in work but struggling to make ends meet are being targeted by Labour and National with tax credits through Working for Families.

Who should I vote for? Poverty policy at a glance
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